New Cancer Therapy Shows Promise in Treating Aggressive Solid Tumors

Offering hope for the New Year comes this story.

A new cancer treatment called CAR-T cell immunotherapy has for the first time been found to work in a solid tumor cancers, offering hope this technique could be used to target other solid tumor cancers, such as pediatric brain cancers and breast cancers, as reported at Gizmodo.com.

In a research study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers from the City of Hope Beckman Research Institute demonstrate the potential for this new therapy to treat a particularly aggressive form of brain cancer, known as recurrent multifocal glioblastoma, an often fatal condition in which the cancer spreads to multiple parts of the brain and spinal column.

The patient was not responding to the usual battery of treatments, including radiation, surgery, and anti-tumor medications, so doctors decided to enroll him a clinical trial designed to test the safety of a new cancer treatment called CAR-T cell therapy.

Seven-and-a-half months later, the patient’s tumor had shrunk to virtually nothing, and he went into remission. Had the patient not received the experimental treatment, his doctors say he would have likely died by now. The tumors have since returned, but importantly, not in the areas of the brain that were treated.

There are nine other patients enrolled in this study, and they’re all responding similarly. And because the modified cells were injected directly to the tumor site, and not intravenously as has been done in other CAR-T treatments, this technique could be used to target other solid tumor cancers, such as pediatric brain cancers and even breast and prostate cancers.

Learn more about this research in the New England Journal of Medicine, and by reading the full report in Gizmodo.

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